Announcements 2017-10-02T15:35:33+00:00

Dermatomyositis (DMS) Risk Assessment

Dermatomyositis (DMS) is a hereditary condition of the skin and muscle, resulting from an unknown inflammatory process. This can present most commonly with hair loss, redness, scaling, crust formation, and vesicles (a type of red bump or bubble on the skin). Some dogs may also suffer from myosotis, an inflammation of muscle. This can result in a loss of muscle, and in severe cases may affect drinking, swallowing and eating.

The CHF Board has recently voted to offer a rebate of $65 to all CHF members. This test is done by cheek swab.  This offer is through 12/31/17 with no limits on the number of rebates per household.

For more information go to Research and Testing.


Canine Cyclic Neutropenia (Gray Collie Syndrome):

The CHF Board has recently voted to offer a rebate of $50 to all CHF members testing either through Health gene or VetGen. This offer is through 12/31/17 with no limits on the number of rebates per household. For more information go to Research and Testing.

Cyclic Neutropenia (CN) is a recessive stem cell disorder that affects both smooth and rough collies. Also known as Cyclic Hematopoiesis or “Gray Collie Syndrome,” dogs affected by Cyclic Neutropenia appear visibly lighter than non-affected littermates – even from puppies with the Merle coloration.

Cyclic Neutropenia is a disease that affects the neutrophils of a dog, which are an integral part of the dog’s immune system. Every 10-12 days, the dog will experience a dramatic drop in the number of neutrophils circulating through his blood stream, leaving him extremely susceptible to infections. The dog will often experience diarrhea, fever, joint pain or other symptoms associated with eye, respiratory, or skin infections. Bleeding episodes can also occur. Unfortunately, most affected dogs will die as puppies, and even with the best care, the dog will not likely live past 2-3 years of age.

Gray Collie Syndrome is an autosomal recessive mutation, meaning that a dog must have two copies of the mutation in order to display the signs and symptoms associated with this disorder. This also means that a parent can be a carrier of this disorder but not show any signs. A dog that carries the mutation can pass on either the normal or mutant allele to any offspring. Therefore, if two carriers produce a litter of pups, there is a 1 in 4, or 25% chance that an offspring will be affected by the disorder. Additionally, 50% of the pups will be carriers and 25% will be clear.


Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
The PRA test (rod-cone dysplasia Type 2 ) is available through OptiGen. The normal price for this test is $130 per dog. As an incentive to test, the Collie Health Foundation will offer – to Collie Health Foundation members – a $50 refund per test with no limits. This special pricing will remain in effect until 12/31/17.

OptiGen will be partnering with the CHF and offering a 25% discount on PRA tests throughout 2017. Price for one test is $104. If CEA and PRA testing is done together, price is $96 per test. After CHF member rebate, it brings the cost down to $54 for one test or $46 each for two tests. The code CHF17REF should be used through the end of 2017.

Please see the OptiGen website for information on testing: http://www.optigen.com/opt9_rcd2testpage.html

DNA for this test can be gathered using a cheek swab, blood, or semen. The rcd2 mutation causes abnormal development (Dysplasia) of the cones and rods (the light sensitive cells in the eye) which leads to an early onset of night blindness that is readily apparent by the time the pup is 6 weeks of age. In most cases, the rcd2-affected dog is completely blind by one year of age.

More information on this disorder can be found by going to Health Issues, Articles on our website for more information on this disease.


Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA)
Collie Eye Anomaly is a recessively inherited eye disorder that causes abnormal development of the choroid – an important layer of tissue under the retina of the eye. The CEA test is available through OptiGen. The normal price for this test is $130 per dog. The Collie Health Foundation will offer – to Collie Health Foundation members – a $50 refund per test. This special pricing, with no limits, will remain in effect until 12/31/17.

OptiGen will be partnering with the CHF and offering a 25% discount on CEA tests throughout 2017. Price for one test is $104. If CEA and PRA testing is done together, price is $96 per test. After CHF member rebate, it brings the cost down to $54 for one test or $46 each for two tests. The code CHF17REF should be used through the end of 2017.

Please see the OptiGen website for information on testing: http://www.optigen.com/opt9_test_cea_ch.html

DNA for this test can be gathered using a cheek swab, blood, or semen. More information on this disorder can be found by going to Health Issues, Articles on our website for more information on this disease.


Multi-Drug Resistant gene (MDR1)
MDR1 is a multidrug sensitivity including antiparasitics, anticancer agents, environmental pesticides and others, which can cause severe reactions, even death, in some Collies. The discovery of the mutation of the multi-drug resistant gene (MDR1), establishment of testing procedures, and development of all reagents was made by Washington State University.

New Pricing on MDR1 testing:
$70 per test if a check or payment is mailed in or $60 for 5 or more dogs tested are mailed in the same envelope. $60 per test when paid online. CHF offers a rebate of $20 per test to CHF Members when testing through Washington State University. This brings the price down to $40 after rebate. Remember, only WSU, VCPL (Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology LAB), has the patent on testing for the MDR1 gene. The rebate remains in effect until 12/31/17.

For more information, go to the Washington State website: http://vcpl.vetmed.wsu.edu/problem-drugs

DNA for this test is gathered using a cheek swab. More information on this disorder can be found by going to Health Issues, Articles on our website for more information on this disease.


How to submit for your CHF subsidy refund:

You can submit your paid receipt to the CHF Treasurer for your refund.
Send to: Karen L. Anderson, PO Box 1681, Atascadero, CA 93423
Email: treasurer@colliehealth.org

Collie Health Foundation

The Collie Health Foundation’s mission is to fund research medical projects that will benefit the future health of the Collie, and to educate the public and Collie breeders about health issues.

Collie Health Foundation Name

On December 17, 2002 the organization changed it’s name from the Collie Club of America Foundation to the Collie Health Foundation in order to give the Foundation a unique identity separate from the Collie Club of America and more clearly represent our mission.

Collie Health Foundation Logo

Our new logo was generously donated by Diana Hiesilieu. There is a story behind this new logo, a story about a Collie we bred and had the extreme privilege of knowing – A Collie by the name of Noah…Read More!